Home > Uncategorized > A beginner’s guide to Java Persistence locking

A beginner’s guide to Java Persistence locking

Vlad Mihalcea

Implicit locking

In concurrency theory, locking is used for protecting mutable shared data against hazardous data integrity anomalies. Because lock management is a very complex problem, most applications rely on their data provider implicit locking techniques.

Delegating the whole locking responsibility to the database system can both simplify application development and prevent concurrency issues, such as deadlocking. Deadlocks can still occur, but the database can detect and take safety measures (arbitrarily releasing one of the two competing locks).

Physical locks

Most database systems use shared (read) and exclusive (write) locks, attributed to specific locking elements (rows, tables). While physical locking is demanded by the SQL standard, the pessimistic approach might hinder scalability.

Modern databases have implemented lightweight locking techniques, such as multiversion concurrency control.

The implicit database locking is hidden behind the transaction isolation level configuration. Each isolation level comes with a predefined locking scheme, aimed for…

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