Home > Uncategorized > What happens when too few databases become too many databases?

What happens when too few databases become too many databases?

Gigaom

So here’s some irony for you: For years, Andy Palmer and his oft-time startup partner Michael Stonebraker have pointed out that database software is not a one-size-fits-all proposition. Companies, they said, would be better off with a specialized database for certain tasks rather than using a general-purpose database for every job under the sun.

And what happened? Lots of specialized databases popped up, such as Vertica (which Stonebraker and Palmer built for data warehouse query applications and is now part of HP). There are read-oriented databases and write-oriented databases and relational databases and non-relational databases … blah, blah, blah.

The unintended consequence of that was the proliferation of new data silos, in addition to those already created by older databases and enterprise applications. And the existence of those new silos pose a next-generation data integration problem for people who want to create massive pools of data they can cull for those big data insights…

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